Ingo Kallenbach

How sick is your strategy (SO 2/7)?

The second part of the series on the Ailing (AO) or Sick Organisation (SO) deals with “incorrect“ strategies of a company. In the following article you will find out what makes a strategy sick, how this can be determined and, on the other hand, how you can be ahead of time and develop competitive benefits.

If a strategy becomes sick, we call it exploiting or wasteful. Both forms illustrate the negative poles of a market- and resource-oriented and thus future-proof approach (refer to Fig. 1, The Sick Organisation). The different developmental stages in the integration of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the organisational strategy show that it can work differently. 

Ingo Kallenbach

When are processes healthy?

A Healthy Organisation (HO) is characterized by solid economic results, suitable processes within the overall organization and a healthy climate. Ultimately it is about the interaction and the balance of the different parameters strategy, structure and culture. Processes play a decisive role in this. Everyone is familiar with examples from his/her own professional experience in which processes were not clearly defined or overregulated.

Ingo Kallenbach

The Sick Organisation (SO 1/7)

After we have unfolded our concepts of the Healthy Organisation (2014) and Leadership in the Healthy Organisation (2015) over the last two years, we would like to focus on the Sick Organisation (SO) and its smaller sister the Ailing Organisation (AO) in this year’s series, as we have already announced in our last notes. It is less fun, since one rather spends time with positive things, nevertheless the reality of the business world often looks different. In this series we would like to give an idea of what goes wrong in organizations, which causes this might have, and which solutions present themselves. 

Ingo Kallenbach

Sustainable leadership in the HO (7/7)

This article is the last one in our series on leadership in the Healthy Organisation. Due to the positive feedback of our readers we will start a new series with the next release of our notes that will deal with the Sick Organisation (SO) and its symptoms. 

We admit, “sustainable“ meanwhile has become such a stale word, that you can’t stand hearing it. By now everything is sustainable. Maybe we should have rather used the new management word of the year, “disruptive“ (FAZ of December 27th, 15), then we would at least remain within the spirit of the times, even if the meaning is completely different.

Ingo Kallenbach

Cross-linked leadership in the Healthy Organisation (HO 6/7)

Starting position:
Maybe you are familiar with this wonderful example: the residents of the Hebrides in Northern Scotland deliberately placed lice in their hair to get healthy. The background is, every time they became sick, there were no lice in their hair. As soon as they had recovered, the lice were back. This led to the wrong causality, that lice are good for their health.

Ingo Kallenbach

The effect of positive and negative customer feedback systems on the success of your organisation

This indeed is an exciting story worth a short article: recently, scientists around the “leadership“ professor Heike Bruch (Organisational energy, Hochschule St. Gallen) have studied the feedback systems of 70 German service companies (Kipfelsberger et al, 2015 - the article can be requested from us). However, before we get to the results and their significance, please evaluate the following questions on your own:

Ingo Kallenbach

Strengths-focused leadership in the HO (5/7)

Not only Andrea Nahles has only recently demanded a leadership culture, in oder to keep employees fit and thus to cover the shortage of skilled professionals. Once again it was proven in an enlightening study of the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health that there is a clear connection between leadership behaviour on the one hand and well-being as well aspsychological health of the employees on the other hand.

Ingo Kallenbach

Value-oriented leadership in the Healthy Organisation (4/7)

Value-oriented leadership is an important component in our concept of the Healthy Organisation. However, in day-to-day business life values often play merely a subordinate role. Companies often underestimate the relevance that values have for their employees. This usually has negative effects. Value-oriented leadership, thus, not only provokes that employees get fully involved with the company, but it fosters a positive economic development in the medium and long term. 

Ingo Kallenbach

Positive Leadership in the Healthy Organisation (3/7)

In this third article of the series “Leadership in the Healthy Organisation“ we look into what we understand as positive leadership, which experiences and scientific background speak for this type of leadership and how positive leadership can be lived. 

Ingo Kallenbach

Strategic leadership in the Healthy Organisation (2/7)

In the last 20 years there has been an increased interest (Yukl 2010) in “Strategic Leadership“ among top executives. Since this time the extent of the influence on top leadership bodies or even only on CEO is being discussed and tried to be proven (see e.g. Giambatista 2005). Definite proof - neither in one nor the other direction - does not exist, however. 

Ingo Kallenbach

"Renewable" energy for exhausted organisations wanted!

How do you assess the energy level in your organisation? High? Low? Running out? How do employees talk about the company during an after-work-beer with friends? Do they gossip about how bad everything is, or do they talk about their daily office life with a positive attitude? And how high do you think is the engagement of your employees to really bring the company forward - not only with their own career in mind?

Ingo Kallenbach

Leadership in the Healthy Organisation (HO) 1/7

After we have successively unfolded the concept of the Healthy Organisation (HO) in 2014, we would like to start a series on leadership in the HO. This article wants to briefly clarify fundamental thoughts and give an overview of the articles that will follow within this series. Conceptually the HO consists of the following cells: strategy, relationships, culture, employees, structure, and processes. 

 

Ingo Kallenbach

Leadership connects, creates, unfolds

In the last part of our series on the setup of a Healthy Organisation (HO) we focus on the power and influence of leadership. Leaders occupy key positions in which they decide on the future strategic orientation, determine structures, and influence culture in their doing. They have a significant influence on the relations of the co-workers amongst each other, the efficiency of processes and the wellbeing and engagement of the employees.

Ingo Kallenbach

What makes employees healthy?

With this note we expand our small series on the Healthy Organisation (HO): The healthy employee. He or she resembles the “fuel“ of a company. If the personnel is impaired in their efficiency due to physical or mental stress, this is not only borne by the individual (Who wants to suffer from burn-out or chronic back pain?), but it costs the German economy annually up to 75 billion €. Which conditions must be fulfilled in order that employees are able to work “healthy“ in the long run? Two central aspects need to be mentioned here:

Ingo Kallenbach

Trend reversal regarding employee engagement?

For the first time since the introduction of the “Employee Engagement Index“ (Gallup Institute) in the year 2001, a positive trend concerning employee engagement can be recognised in Germany: The percentage of non-engaged employees has decreased from 24% to 17%! This decline possibly reflects the tendency in German companies of putting the organisational structure more in the focus.